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Cognition in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

Why compare cognition in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder? 

Cognitive deficits are core features of both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Establishing differences in cognition between these disorders may be useful for identifying differences in the underlying illness pathologies, and may provide potential targets for individual treatments.

What is the evidence for cognitive functioning in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder?

High quality evidence shows a small to medium-sized effect of poorer performance on various executive functioning tasks in people with schizophrenia compared to people with bipolar disorder or schizoaffective disorder. There is a medium-sized effect of poorer performance on verbal immediate memory, verbal delayed memory, and visual delayed memory tasks in people with schizophrenia. Moderate quality evidence suggests this finding may also be applicable to verbal working memory but not to visual immediate memory. There is a small to medium-sized effect of poorer performance on mental or psychomotor speed tasks in people with schizophrenia, particularly people with more severe symptoms, who are at a young age, and with fewer years of education. Moderate quality evidence suggests a small to medium-sized effect of lower current IQ in people with schizophrenia, and high quality evidence shows a medium-sized effect of poorer premorbid IQ in people with first-episode schizophrenia compared to people with first-episode bipolar disorder.

 

April 2016

Page last updated: 5:27  14 November 2018

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