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Mode of administration

What is mode of administration?

Studies have shown that about 80% of patients relapse to psychosis within 5 years of initial treatment. This is often due to lack of adherence to antipsychotic medications. Long-acting injectable antipsychotics are a treatment option for patients who are not adhering to treatment or who do not remember to take their oral preparations.

What is the evidence for mode of administration?

High quality evidence shows long-acting injectable second generation antipsychotics are more effect than placebo injections for symptom improvement.

Moderate to low quality evidence suggests the reduction in hospitalisation rates after commencing antipsychotic treatment is greater in patients receiving long-acting injectable antipsychotics than in patients receiving oral antipsychotics, however moderate to high quality evidence suggests no differences in relapse rates or symptoms.

Moderate to low quality evidence suggests a greater risk of extrapyramidal side effects and weight gain, but less anxiety with long-acting injectable second generation antipsychotics than with placebo injections.

High quality evidence suggests more low-density lipoprotein cholesterol change and less prolactin change in patients receiving long-acting injectable antipsychotics than in patients receiving oral antipsychotics. High quality evidence also suggests no differences in serious adverse effects or rates of at least one adverse event.

Moderate to high quality evidence suggests more anxiety with long-acting injectable antipsychotics than with oral antipsychotics, with no differences in treatment discontinuation due to adverse events or in death rates.

 

March 2017

Page last updated: 23:22  22 August 2017

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