Treatments for childhood onset and early onset schizophrenia

What is childhood and early-onset schizophrenia?

Childhood-onset schizophrenia is defined as schizophrenia with onset prior to the age of 13 years, and early-onset schizophrenia describes schizophrenia between the ages of 13 and 17 years.

What is the evidence for psychosocial treatments for childhood and early-onset schizophrenia?

Moderate to low quality evidence suggests supportive therapy may be better than cognitive behavioural therapy for improving mental state, and cognitive behavioural therapy may be better than supportive therapy for improving insight in children with early-onset schizophrenia. Cognitive remediation may improve verbal memory, executive cognitive functioning (e.g. problem solving), daily living, and general functioning. Education about the illness may be beneficial for improving symptoms and functioning.

Also see the Course and Outcome childhood onset topic.

April 2016

Treatments for childhood and early-onset schizophrenia

What is childhood and early-onset schizophrenia?

Childhood-onset schizophrenia is defined as schizophrenia with onset prior to the age of 13 years, and early-onset schizophrenia describes schizophrenia onset between the ages of 13 and 17 years.

What is the evidence for pharmaceutical treatments for childhood and early-onset schizophrenia?

Compared to placebo, moderate to high quality evidence suggests medium-sized improvements in overall symptoms with olanzapine, risperidone, or paliperidone, and small improvements with quetiapine, aripiprazole, or asenapine. For positive symptoms, there were medium-sized improvements with olanzapine, risperidone, or asenapine, and small improvements with quetiapine, aripiprazole, or paliperidone. For negative symptoms, there were small to medium-sized improvements with aripiprazole, asenapine, molindone, olanzapine and risperidone. For social functioning, there were small to medium-sized improvements with aripiprazole, asenapine paliperidone and risperidone. Only quetiapine improved depression.

Moderate quality evidence suggests less use of benzodiazepines, less corrected QT, and less total bilirubin with second generation antipsychotics compared to placebo. However, antipsychotics are associated with more weight gain (particularly olanzapine and quetiapine), movement side effects (particularly paliperidione, ziprasidone, risperidone, and aripiprazole), somnolence, low or high prolactin levels, high triglycerides, high alanine aminotransferase, and high uric acid.

Compared to first generation antipsychotics in general, moderate quality evidence suggests a small to medium-sized benefit of second generation antipsychotics for global and mental state. Compared to low dose antipsychotics, moderate to high quality evidence suggests greater improvement in global state with standard dose antipsychotics, although there are more side effects with standard doses.

Also see the Course and Outcomes childhood onset topic, and the psychosocial treatments for childhood and early-onset schizophrenia topic.

 

July 2017

Childhood and early-onset schizophrenia

 

What is childhood and early-onset schizophrenia?

Childhood-onset schizophrenia has an onset prior to the age of 13 years, and early-onset schizophrenia has an onset between the ages of 13 and 17 years.

What is the evidence on childhood and early-onset schizophrenia?

Moderate quality evidence suggests poorer long-term functioning in children and adolescents with early-onset schizophrenia compared to other psychiatric disorders.

 

Also see treatments (pharmaceutical and psychosocial) for childhood and early-onset schizophrenia.

 

February 2019