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Topics tagged with "Schizophrenia treatment"

Vagus nerve stimulation

What is vagus nerve stimulation (VNS)? VNS provides indirect modulation of brain network activity through the stimulation of cranial nerves. Invasive VNS involves surgical implantation of a small pulse generator under the skin which is programmed to deliver long-lasting, intermittent electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve. Non-invasive stimulation involves attaching a stimulator to the outer ear close to the ear canal, which delivers electrical impulses through the skin to the vagus nerve. What is the evidence for VNS? Low quality evidence is unable to determine any benefit of non-invasive VNS for the symptoms of schizophrenia. Review authors state that many…

Which treatments are most effective?

Antipsychotic medication is the main treatment option for schizophrenia. Patients may need to try several types, or combinations of antipsychotics before finding a treatment regime that suits them best. There is also evidence that therapy in combination with antipsychotic medication is effective for symptoms, particularly in the early stages of the disorder. Other treatment options include adjunctive, or medication from other drug classes that are taken in addition to antipsychotics. There are also other physical, non-pharmaceutical treatments that may be effective when pharmaceutical options are not working as well as desired, although these options are mostly still experimental. Your clinician,…

Carpipramine

What is carpipramine? Second generation antipsychotics (sometimes referred to as ‘atypical’ antipsychotics) such as carpipramine are a newer class of antipsychotic medication than first generation ‘typical’ antipsychotics. Second generation antipsychotics are effective for the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. It is sometimes claimed that they are more effective than first generation antipsychotics in treating the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, although the evidence for this is weak. Negative symptoms include a lack of ordinary mental activities such as emotional expression, social engagement, thinking and motivation, whereas positive symptoms include the experiences of perceptual abnormalities (hallucinations) and fixed, false, irrational beliefs (delusions). Second…

NeuRA Libraries

Title Colour Legend:
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Orange - Topic summary is being compiled.
Red - Topic summary has no current systematic review available.